Jean Hippolyte Marchand |"Lascivious Woman"| Bloomsbury Group

Jean Hippolyte Marchand (1882-1940)

« Lascivious Woman»

Signed, around 1920

Height: 65 cm. (25,6in.) 

Length : 54 cm. (21,25in.)

Inventory Number : 010-1216

 

Photographe of the Work: 

 

1/ Painting by Jean Hippolyte Marchand (1883-1940) "Lascivious Woman"

2/ Detail of the Painting by Jean Hippolyte Marchand (1883-1940) "Lascivious Woman"

 

******* 

"For the most part, they are painted with the same love, the same tender care, whether it be a little girl, a woman or an old woman. There is the essence of the art of M. Jean Marchand, an art of emotion, intimacy, and interior attraction. The painting of this artist gently communicates the collected sentimentality which is his; It does not impose itself with a crash, but it is one of those in which new qualities appear every day to reveal themselves. His paintings count among those whom one loves more and more and better as one looks at them and mixes them with one's own life"

Citation of René-Jean

*******

 

Jean Hippolyte MARCHAND (1882-1940)

 

Jean Hippolyte Marchand |1883-1940 | Autoportrait | Dessin

 

 

Jean Hippolyte Marchand is a French painter, engraver, illustrator and designer. Concerning his painting, he will make landscapes, figurative compositions, still lifes or, exceptionally, decorations.

He was born in Paris on November 22, 1883. His family is totally opposed to his passion. At the age of 18, he left to try this adventure alone.

From 1902 to 1906, he studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in the workshops of Léon Bonnat and Luc-Olivier Merson. At the same time, he must work to support himself. Its material situation is precarious and will remain so for many years. His love for painting seems unfailing. René Marchand writes: "It is no exaggeration to say, for him, he braved his family, endured sorrows, hungered." One day, at the Academy of Vitti, M. Henry Guillaume Martin was astonished to see him painted on a towel nailed to a frame.

In 1908, he exhibited for the first time at the Salon des Indépendants

In 1909 he spent several months in the academy of Vitti, a free academy, the courses of Henri Martin (1860-1943)

After unsuccessful attempts at applied art he devoted himself entirely to painting.

In 1910, he exhibited simultaneously in Paris (Salon des Indépendants, Gold Section) and in London.

It will notably be noticed by Roger Fry and Clive Bell, advisors of the famous Grafton Gallery. At the time his art is close to postimpressionism (Still life, landscapes, etc.).

The British collector Samuel Courtauld (1876-1947) acquired some of his paintings. The young painter then approached members of the Bloomsbury Group.

He will be part of the small group of French who will join this movement. Among these French painters are: Simon BussyHenri Gaudier-Brzeska or Henri Lucien Doucet.

Around 1912 he experimented with Cubism. It will sometimes make multiple futuristic images. After this short period, he moved towards a vigorous naturalist style that can be likened to that of Derain.

Before the war he made several visits to Russia and England.

In 1914 he was mobilized. The poor state of health of Jean Hippolyte Marchand obliges him to remain in the auxiliary services. He is in turn conveyor, man of chores, photographer. He makes some drawings and watercolors. During his mission to La Palisse, he executed some marines. Two of these marines are preserved in the War Museum: "The American sailboats" and "The submarines".

In 1918, after the demobilization he settled in the Yvelines, near Paris where he painted landscapes. He composed the large panel entitled "Le Soir" which will be presented at the Salon d'Automne in 1919.

In 1919, part of her work was exhibited in London in a collective exhibition at the Carfax Gallery. On this occasion Clive Bell wrote: "No living painter is no longer interested only in the creation of form and the emotional significance of shapes and colors that Marchand"

In the 1920s, Jean Marchand's work significantly influenced the aesthetic theories promoted by Clive Bell and Roger Fry. Roger Fry included an essay on Marchand in his very influential vision and design published in 1920.

In 1925, he separated from his wife, the artist Sonia Lewitska

In 1928, Jean Marchand left for Syria. He will, for example, make great decorations for the "Jeu des Pigeons" in Damascus. He also painted the murals of the Beirut Residence. During his stay he will also make scenes of religious morals such as "Dervishes turners" or even "Kaderiyehs"

In 1930 he was exhibited at the Galerie Georges Giroux in Brussels.

He had a posthumous exhibition at the Redfern Gallery in London in 1955, followed by retrospectives in Paris, Basel, Milan, Rome in 1956 and at the Galerie del Cavallino in Venice in 1957.

The work of Jean Marchand includes in 1927, about 800 paintings and 1200 drawings.

 

Some Paintings by Jean Hippolyte MARCHAND

 

Jean Hippolyte Marchand |1883-1940 | "Quai de la Seine" | Sotheby's, July 12, 2005

« Le quai de la Seine », sold at Sotheby’s, July 12, 2005

Jean Hippolyte Marchand |1883-1940 | Maternity | 1921, Tate Museum

« Maternity », 1921, Tate Museum

Jean Hippolyte Marchand |1883-1940 | Funicular of Montmartre | Museum of modern Art | Paris

« Funicular of Montmartre », Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris



Thoughts of Jean Hippolyte MARCHAND about Art

 

"Some people regard painting as an obscure problem that is constantly complicated by new formulas. I do not think that the truth is more in the formulas of yesterday than in that of the day after tomorrow; it is situated in a top plane. It matter first of all to provoke, in the sensitive spectator, that impulse which takes him beyond the visual aspect of things, into a more solemn and deeper reality which makes painting a transfiguration of objects the most trivial."

Jean MARCHAND

 

Jean Hippolyte MARCHAND and the Critique

 

"Merchant is a modest. In an assembly of painters he avoids declaiming theories; He is the last to speak, yet he must be compelled to do so. Then he said things very reasonable, in a very soft voice. It is an admirable spectacle that the arrival of Marchand to the Independents. He unloads his canvases from an old fiacre at a gallery that seems to be preserved for him; at the wicket he claims his serial number, as a timid freelancer would ask for a third soldier for Amiens.

But Marchand's talent is less modest than himself. Her paintings are those that give pride of place to a Salon where young people do the lesson. One hesitates a little to place them; Is it necessary to lodge Marchand among the fauves of yesterday or the cubists of tomorrow? It is usually installed not far from André Lhote. But tomorrow these two artists, well classified, will find themselves singularly distant from one another. "

André SALMON | Paris-Journal | 17 January 1912

"(...) we can expect a lot from Merchant, I will follow the work of this artist (...)"

Guillaume APOLLINAIRE | The Intransigeant | Independent Salon, April 1911

"La Suzanne, by Marchand, is one of the best consignments of the Salon. (...) It is a very sincere poetry made of chastity and nobility that breathe these beautiful nudes expressed with plenitude. "

Roger ALLARD | Independent Review | Salon d'Automne, December 1912

"With fairly weak means, a craft lacking in skill and even a certain poverty in execution, this artist arrives at results that impose on us. That is what a man's honesty and conscience can do. A tree is a tree; it is not a stain that walks like a witch's broom. A road is the good hard ground on which you walk. Mr. Marchand's landscapes tell you that. They are well in depth and in perspective, well in their plans, with their lights that make them vibrate. "

Jean VARIOT | Weekly Review | 7 February 1920

"(...) True simplicity and the charm of things deeply felt (...)"

André WARNOD | The Future | January 1920

"M. Marchand is one of the hopes of the young school, and provokes an admiring expectation around him. He has adjoined Cubism in the manner of those who looked at Cezanne and Poussin; It remained classic and of a pure but traditional design that seeks the nobility of the line. The danger of appearing thus images of life, elevated by style to a superior meaning, is to imprint his picture with a little coldness. M. Marchand does not quite escape it; But it comes to style; His painting "Le Soir", with its beautiful sky and the almost hieratic stature of its rider, is a good picture. "

Gustave KHAN | The Hour | 3 November 1919

"It is French, it is classic; It is not he who, under pretense of contempt, will avoid the description, he pursues it "to the limits behind the attenible. The purpose of the world is the development of the mind, Renan said. Jean Marchand is careful not to forget that it is important in art to express above all that force of impetus which raises nature towards the imperceptible hole of the pertuis that leads to another heaven. And this is the meaning of the noble cadences, the subtle harmonies of colors, disdained by the true common, Jean Marchand gives to the exalting realities of life. The drawing is bold, but avowed by the painter without declamation. His honest and sincere work is of a rare and disciplined distinction, and it is not without effort that the artist succeeded in realizing in himself the powerful simplicity of the masters. Easy artifacts of the palette and pencil.

But a severity, a haughty, harmonious charm, emerges from the definitive works. At the price of what anxieties, what doubts, what pains! "

Max GOTH | The Men of the Day | 20 October 1917

 

Jean Hippolyte MARCHAND in Museums 

 

Jean Marchand's paintings are in public collections throughout the world:

- "Still life with fruit and a flower pot", oil on canvas, 1912, Charleston Museum, England

- "Maternity", oil on canvas, 1921, Tate Museum, London, England

- "Palm Tree", oil on canvas, 1914, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, England

- "Angelina", oil on canvas, 1923, Tate Museum, London, England

- "View in the Midi", oil on canvas, 1913, Tate Museum, London, England

- “Landscape at Vence”, oil on canvas, 1927, Tate Museum, London, England

- "Woman standing", charcoal, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, England

- "Saint Paul", oil on canvas, 1921, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, England

- "Still Life with Earthenware Jug, Loaf and Strawberries", oil on canvas, 1918, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, England

- "Still Life with Fruit and Candlestick", oil on canvas, 1920, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, England

- “Olive Trees, Vence”, oil on canvas, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester, England

- "The Lady in Brown", oil on canvas, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester, England

- “Portrait of a Lady”, oil on canvas, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester, England

- “French Village”, oil on canvas, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester, England

- "Woman Reading", oil on canvas, Cheltenham Art Museum, Cheltenham, England

- “La Rochelle, France”, oil on canvas, Museum of Gloucester, Gloucester, England

- “Nocturne”, oil on canvas, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, England

- "The Lake", oil on canvas, National Galleries of Scotland, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, Scotland

- "Paysage Provençal", oil on canvas, National Museum Wales, National Museum Cardiff, Cardiff, Wales

- "Les Terrasses", oil on canvas, The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archeology, Oxford, England

- "Reclining Figure", oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum (MET), New York, USA

- "Vence", oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum (MET), New York, USA

- "Landscape, the green jersey ", oil on canvas, Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Belgium

- "View of a Street", oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art (MoMa), Manhattan, New York, USA

- «Still Life», oil on canvas, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "Woman wearing a hat", engraving, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "The Park at Versailles", drawing, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "S. Rocco, Via di Ripeta, Rome", drawing, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "Piazza delle Signoria, Florence", drawing, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "Study for" The Village Entrance "", drawing, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "Quai de Béthune", print, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "Still-life: Vase containing flowers", drawing, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- "The Viaduct", drawing, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

- “Portrait of a woman”, oil on canvas, Center Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France

- "Funicular of Montmartre", oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris (MAM), France

- "Railroad in Russia", oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris (MAM), France

- "The beautiful Georgian", oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris (MAM), Paris, France

- “Woman with her toilet”, oil on canvas, Center Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France

- “Escalier de Montmartre”, oil on canvas, Center Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France

- "The blue vase", oil on canvas, Troyes, Museum of Modern Art

- "Rennemoulins", oil on canvas, Center Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France

- "Villepreux", oil on canvas, Troyes, Museum of Modern Art

  

Books illustrated by Jean Hyppolite Marchand

  

- Saint-François of ASSISE | The Song of the Sun | With wood engraved by Jean Marchand | Rouart, the Catholic Art, 1918

- Paul CLAUDEL | The Way of the Cross | With wood engraved by Jean Marchand | 1918

- Fritz VANDERPYL | The Last Seasons | With wood engraved by Jean Marchand | The Beautiful Edition | 1919

- René-Jean | Twenty-six reproductions of paintings and drawings | New French Review | 1920

- Henry MALHERBE | The Last Judgment | With wood engraved by Jean Marchand | Editions of the Siren, 1920

- Paul VALERY | The Serpent | With black lithographs by Jean Marchand and Sonia Lewitska | Eos | 1926

- The Legend of Mélusine | Boivin | 1927.

- Paul VALERY | The Marine Cemetery | The Centaine | 1927

- Francis de MIOMANDRE | Grasse | Émile-Paul frères | 1928

- Paul VALERY | Letter to Madam C ... | Grasset | 1928